Articles

Our love affair with the furry and feathered has produced a nation of pet owners, many of whom need tissues and pet allergy medicines to cope. Can pets be a part of an allergy sufferer's world?

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Bees and ants usually are looking for food, not trouble. But cross their paths, or their nests, and you could feel their sting. About 40 people in the United States die from allergic reactions to insect venom each year. After you have been stung once, you can become allergic to that insect's venom.

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The annual airborne spore offensive is once again causing runny noses, swollen eyes and uncontrollable sneezing in thousands of people suffering from hay fever, or pollinosis. Between 20 to 30 per cent of Finns suffer from pollen allergies. Amongst the most common culprits are birch, alder, hazel, grass and mugwort.

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The Chris Draft Family Foundation (CDFF) and the American Lung Association are working together to recognize families who are tackling asthma.

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If you are dust-sensitive, especially if you have allergies and/or asthma, you can reduce some of your misery by creating a "dust-free" bedroom. Dust may contain molds, fibers, and dander from dogs, cats, and other animals, as well as tiny dust mites.

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Millions of Americans suffer from sneezing, coughing, itching, runny noses, and watering eyes when the pollen starts to fly. Each spring, summer, and fall tiny particles are released from trees, weeds, and grasses.

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After a long, dreary winter, most Canadians can’t wait for spring. That first hint of a warm breeze that catches us off guard and the tiny buds appearing on the ends of gnarled branches are like a balm to our cold-weary selves.

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CBC News- The winter cold and flu season may be drawing  to a close, but many people in the Ottawa region won't be able to put away the tissues. The rapidly melting snow is uncovering moulds that can cause sneezing, wheezing, rashes and other allergic reactions in some people.

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Most patients who are allergic to cats are aware of symptoms on entering a house with a cat or if they touch their face after contact with an animal.

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Genelle Weule- The swimming pool has provided a haven from the heat for generations of Australians.

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What is an Allergist?

An allergist/immunologist is a physician specially trained to manage and treat allergies and asthma. Becoming an allergist/immunologist requires completion of at least nine years of training. After completing medical school and graduating with a medical degree, a physician will then undergo three years of training in internal medicine (to become an internist) or pediatrics (to become a pediatrician). 


Pillow Encasings Covers for Allergies


You might think dust mites take up only a little room in your bed. In fact, within 10 years, dead dust mites and their waste can double the weight of your mattress.

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